Photos are made by Annese's Brothers and Federica Mancini

In Alberobello the worship of Saints Cosma and Damiano developed perhaps during the seventeenth century in the oratory next to Acquaviva's palace. Believers, who were very attached to the here-stored painting, had made a copy of it in order to put it on the church altar. Since 1725 this church was enlarged and a cemetery was built next to it.
In 1785 the Saints relics - which were stored in Bari - were taken to Alberobello. Ten years later, the church was enlarged again, by the construction of the nave perpendicular to the main one and two new altars, the first one dedicated to Saint Paschal Baylon and the other one dedicated to the Lady of the Rosary. The main altar was rebuilt and the choir was added behind it. In 1797 the baptismal font was added.
On the main altar a new painting was put, illustrating the Virgin Mary together with Saints Cosma and Damiano, Saint Francis from Paola and Saint Joseph. Until 1871 believers carried this painting during the procession. In order not to risk the painting to be stolen a peasant, Giuseppe Domenico Rinaldi, asked the sculpture Antolini to make two wood statues of the Saints. The sculpture delivered only one of the two before dying, that of Saint Cosma (in 1782). Therefore, the other one was made by Luca from Rutigliano in 1784.
In 1814 the church became a parish. In 1881 the Municipality decided to remake the façade, asking the architect Antonio Curri (1848-1916) to design it. The new façade - which is built with limestone - possesses pillars and columns. The pediment is flanked by the statue of Saint Peter and that of Saint Paul. The church has two bell towers, whose cells end with a pyramidal roof. The big stairs get to a pronaos. Here, a marble memorial slab remembers the remaking of the new façade, which was inaugurated in 1885.
In 1973 a polyptych representing Crucified Christ with the Sorrowful Mother and Saints was put on the lunette. Two years later the bronze door replaced the old one. On the door there are eight bas-relieves representing the Beatitudes and 59 characters.
According to Curri's project the apse was renovated and took an octagonal shape; moreover, six big windows were made. The dome, on the other hand, has never been built. In the 40's and 50's the two transept arms were enlarged and the niche in which the two Saints statues are situated was built.
The building structure has been finished in 1966.
The years later other works have been added, e.g. the main altar and the suspended crucifix, made by Adolfo Rollo. He also made the ten paintings representing "The Holy Mother with the Child among Saints" and "Christ among prophets and Saints of New and Old Testament".
Onofrio Bramante, on the other hand, painted "The mercy of Lord" and "The guide Jesus", together with the fourteen paintings representing "The way of the Cross" and "The Holy Mother from Pompei".

Translated by Ilaria Noemi De Carlo

The architect Antonio Curri was born in this simple house, which dates back to 1831 and which is situated in Piazza del Popolo. Antonio Curri has been very important for Alberobello's history and was very famous at his time. Gabriele D’Annunzio wrote the following comments about him: "He's an architect who has shown several times his great sense of art, the purity essence of antique beauty" (in "Pagine disperse", edited by Alighiero Castelli).
In the tenth anniversary of his death citizens decided to put a marble slab - made by Gaetano Stella - on the façade of this house in order to remember the famous architect. Next to some words written in his memory there is a bronze sculpture, also made by Gaetano Stella, which is an allegory of Architecture, who holds a column with an ionic capital and a laurel wreath.

Translated by Ilaria Noemi De Carlo

A local legend tells that on the 22 June 1797, while the first mayor of Alberobello was being elected, Francesco D'Amore was starting to build this house, the first one which was built in cotto, i.e. with mortar, after the king's permission to use binders. This event is proved by the following inscription, which is placed below the balcony’s arch of the house: EX AUCTORITATE REGIA - HOC PRIMUM ERECTUM - A.D. 1797.
The place in which this house was built is strategic because from its first floor it was easy to control the Counts' palace.
This building does not actually represent the transition from drystone building techniques to those of the nineteenth century houses. The hall does not have the typical cone roof but a vaulted-roof, whereas the other rooms are very similar to trulli. The only different element - apart from the use of mortar - is the presence of two floors. The first floor is made of three small rooms, placed at different levels. The first one is a big trullo, followed by a smaller one. The last one permits to access the balcony.

Translated by Ilaria Noemi De Carlo

Saints Cosma and Damiano congregation was founded in 1843. Firstly, they met at the chapel next to Acquaviva's palace. However, they needed a chapel where to practice their religious activities. The 12 April 1855 the bishop allowed them to build an oratory, which was to be quite far from the parish church and the Santissimo Sacramento's oratory. Believers' donations allowed this chapel to be built.
The building, which is dedicated to the Holy Mary of Carmine, was consecrated in 1856.
During the next decades the number of the congregation members decreased, so they had to join the Santissimo Sacramento's congregation, but they finally broke up in 1974.

Translated by Ilaria Noemi De Carlo

This church, which stands out from Rione Monti, was built in fourteen months on the land donated by a benefactress, according to the project designed by Martino De Leonardis. The first project was partially completed thanks to the intervention of the engineer Bianchi.
The building was opened the 13 June 1927. The first treasurer, appointed in 1946, was the founder himself, the priest Antonio Lippolis, who donated a trullo-shaped house - with the adjoining yards - to the Institute of the Servants of Charity Don Luigi Guanella. In 1952 the church became a parish.
The fa¸ade of the building is divided into three parts; the central one shows a cusp and a big arch in which the entrance door is placed.
The church - in the shape of a Greek cross - presents a trullo-shaped, conic roof ending with a square-base skylight. The four main pillars hold curved arches which hold the lateral vaults. Some years later, another room was added to the original building.
Firstly, in the church there was just one single altar and a big "Crucified Christ", made by Adolfo Rollo.
Between 1954 and 1960 the church was renovated, adapting the main altar to the new religious needs and building the two lateral altars, the one dedicated to the Holy Mother, at the right, and the one dedicated to Saint Anthony, at the left. The bas-relieves representing Saint's life and the main wall decorations were made by Adolfo Rollo, too.

Translated by Ilaria Noemi De Carlo

This small church, free of transept and with just one single nave, is placed in Piazza Gian Girolamo Acquaviva, next to the Panoramic viewpoint. This area has been protected since 1930.
The church was built in order to house the congregation of Santissimo Sacramento, which had been founded in 1823, recognized in 1826 and which had met at Trullo Sovrano until that moment.
The bishop and the congregation asked for this church to be built because in the parish church there was no more space for the religious activities to be carried on.
It was restored and opened in 1856 and it has been renovated several times until the end of the nineteenth century.
In 1904 the priest, with the authorization of the bishop Antonio Lamberti, obtained a relic of Saint Lucy from Venice.

Translated by Ilaria Noemi De Carlo

This sixteenth century boulevard, whose planning was probably committed by the mayor Giulio Ernesto Acquaviva to the architect Antonio Curri, links all the most important buildings of the town: Acquaviva’s palace, the Church of Saints Cosma and Damiano and the town hall. The first two buildings were the opposite poles of the boulevard, whereas the Town Hall was built on the boulevard itself.
Nineteenth-century palaces were all constructed around these three buildings, gradually taking the place of trulli and marking the transition from the power of old aristocracy to that of rich land holder bourgeoisie. During this period there was the need to build majestic, elegant dwellings in order to differentiate them from the previous houses, i.e. trulli.
Some examples of these palaces are Palazzo Cassano (Cassano's palace), Casa Bernardi (Bernardi's house) and Palazzo Agrusti (Agrusti's house). Particular attention was also drawn to the interior's decorations. In Agrusti's house, thanks to Antonio Curri, there are rooms decorated by two artists from Naples: Salvatore Cozzolino and Luigi Fabron.
The same characteristics are present in all the nineteenth and twentieth buildings which are placed in Corso Trieste e Trento, Via Garibaldi and Via Cesare Battisti. Almost all of them have big façades, with many decorations and elements which have a religious and magic value.

Translated by Ilaria Noemi De Carlo

Alberobello's Memorial Monument is an Obelisk dedicated toWorld War I victims. It was built in Piazza della Vittoria square – which was later renamed as Piazza del Popolo – and it was inaugurated the 27 May 1923.
At the base of the Obelisk there are four marble slabs where you can read the names of the victims and the speech of the mayor of that time.
Although it was built ​​by the sculptor G. Bari Laricchia, this sleek monolithic Monument had been designed by architect Antonio Curri (1848-1916) in 1897, with the aim of celebrating the first Anniversary of Liberation from feudal oppression.
However, the work was not made due to financial difficulties and new laws. Its project was archived until 1919, when it was used for building the current Monument, making some changes to the original project.

Translated by Domenico Sonnante
Revised by Ilaria Noemi De Carlo

Alberobello's Territory Museum is held in an ancient trullo located between Piazza XXVII Maggio and Piazza M. Pagano, near Aia Piccola district. It has been a National Monument since 1930.
This ancient house is composed of several rooms which have a trullo-shaped conic roof and which have been built in different periods.
The oldest part of the trullo consists of simple and small building structures. It overlooks Piazza M. Pagano.
Originally, there were single-celled structures, with focarili and alcove, built with old building techniques and characterized by walls made with non-squared stones and without any mortar.
Afterwards, other trulli and a two-floors building were added to this oldest part.
The two-floors building – which has a trullo-shaped conic roof – overlooks Piazza XXVII Maggio.
The house was owned by doctor Giacomo Pezzolla, who was accused, in a deed dated 15 April 1797, of having built a small loggia, thus changing the look of the dwelling and violating Count’s indications.
The façade of this building is particularly accurate and shows discreet decorative elements: a stone cornice and a pediment go along the perimeter of the door and the window lintels, which are embellished with ornamental motifs typical of the late eighteenth century.
At the left side of the square there are the trullo-shaped barns, which belonged to the counts, too. They were used by peasants, who were obliged to beat the wheat crops.
The weekly market, which took place for the first time in 1855, was held in the same square.

Translated by Domenico Sonnante
Revised by Ilaria Noemi De Carlo

Behind the Basilica of Saints Cosma and Damiano you can find Piazza Sacramento, where an outstanding trullo is located. It is Trullo Sovrano building, which has been called this way since 1916 and which has been a National Monument since 1930.
According to the local historian Notarnicola, the building was originally called the Court of Pope Cataldo (here "Pope" stands for "Priest"), because it was probably built on behalf of the family of Priest Cataldo Perta (1744-1809) in order to be used as their dwelling, while all the surrounding trulli were inhabited by their employers.
Afterwards, it has been renamed Trullo Sovrano (sovereign trullo) because it is the only trullo which is built on two floors.
Throughout the centuries Trullo Sovrano has been used as a spice store, a chapel, and a dwelling as well.
In 1785 it was used to keep the relics of Saints Cosma and Damiano, brought there by Cataldo Perta from Rome.
From 1823 to 1837 it housed the oratory of the congregation of Santissimo Sacramento.
Thanks to the uniqueness of its architecture, Trullo Sovrano is the symbol of the most developed trulli's building techniques and, at the same time, it represents the beginning of the new way of building trulli, with the use of mortar.
Built by an unknown manufacturer, Trullo Sovrano has a main entrance door facing South. It is inserted into a large gable fa¸ade, and it basically consists of an arch with a lunette on which there is a fresco illustrating a scene of the Calvary which probably dates back to the mid nineteenth century.
On the side of the door there are two peepholes, which were used at the same time to recognize a well-accepted guest and to shoot at spiteful people.
Inside, after crossing the small bedroom situated on the left side, you get into the large hall, which shows a groin vault and a series of small arches leaning against the perimeter wall. Then, you can reach the kitchen, from which you can get to the garden.
A door on the left side let you get to the first built-up living space, around which all the trullo was built. The ladder which takes to the first floor - which was used for hosting guests or for weaving - was built within the wall.
The Trullo Sovrano was restored in 1993; nowadays it is a museum.

Translated by Domenico Sonnante
Revised by Ilaria Noemi De Carlo

Albea's winery, which has become a wine museum, "pays homage" to enology and agricultural culture of the area and of the whole Puglia.
Strongly supported by Cav. Dante Renzini, the wine museum is situated in some rooms of the Albea’s winery upper floor. The winery is an interesting twentieth-century industrial architecture building, where you can compare old agricultural tools with modern tools and technologies.
Visiting it you will appreciate last century development and evolution of the wine production in Puglia.
The rich collection of old agricultural tools and the photographic documentation will let you know the various winemaking techniques which were adopted in the past, then getting to the more refined and sophisticated ones, which are used nowadays. So, do not miss it!

Translated by Domenico Sonnante
Revised by Ilaria Noemi De Carlo

Acquaviva's Palace was built by Count Gian Girolamo II Acquaviva d'Aragona, also called "Guercio di Puglia" (i.e. "the Squinterman of Puglia"), in order to be used as his hunt dwelling. On the palace façade there is the following inscription: "IOANNIS HIERO / NYMI AQUAVIVA B / ARAGONIA VIII / CONVERSANI COMITIS / IUSSU 1635". It actually proves the palace construction.
Its position allowed him to control the Rione Monti Quarter.
Acquaviva's descendants continued to live here even after the liberation from the feud and participated in public and political life.
There is a document, dating back to 1822, which talks about the presence of different underground spaces, which were used as mills, cowsheds, barns and ateliers.
This document tells that in the upper floor of the palace - which was reserved to Acquaviva’s family - there were 13 rooms, which were next to the family chapel, dedicated to Saints Cosma and Damiano. In 1636 the Count asked to collocate a painting of Loreto's Holy Mother and Saints Cosma and Damiano in the chapel.
The worship of the Saints was probably carried out thanks to Isabella Filomarino, Gian Girolamo’s wife, who took care of him until his death, in 1665.
In 1878 the Count committed a restoration project to the well-known architect Giovanni Castelli (1825-1902), who - at that time - was following the building works of Bari's University. According to the project the palace was to be enlarged and new buildings were to be built in Piazza Gian Girolamo and Piazza del Popolo. A hanging garden was to be built next to the big cowsheds, which still exist. However, only some changes were actually made.
In 1891, when the Count died, his wife asked the Engineer Vincenzo Ripoli from Rossano Calabro to carry out a new project, which has never been fulfilled. Isabella Filomarino acquired many paintings and works which - after her death - were acquired by her nephew, Gabriella Laboni Bocchigliero, wife of Avati.
The palace was renovated in the first decades of the twentieth century and the spaces which overlook Piazza del Popolo and which had been used as stables were restored in obedience to the mayor Pietro Campione’s will.

Translated by Domenico Sonnante and Ilaria Noemi De Carlo

The Town Hall, planned in 1843 by architect Vincenzo Fallacara, overlooks Piazza del Popolo, Alberobello's main square. The building process was carried out from 1844 to 1848, under the monitoring of two brothers, Orazio and Tommaso Curri. Besides modifying the initial project, they built a "Clock Tower", whose works "were carried out without following the original project and agreement, but according to a new project". In 1863 the building was inaugurated. In 1867 the youngest Tommaso Curri's son, Antonio Curri (1848-1916), planned a second floor in order to satisfy building enlargement needs.
The watercolor drawing of this project – now kept in a private collection in Rome – shows the creation of three new bodies, connected to the original building.
In Curri's project the central one should be flanked by two towers, which would end with a structure typical of neoclassical circular temples, and with symmetrical lateral bodies. However, his project was only partially followed. Only the left tower was built, even though it was actually demolished in the late twentieth century.
Since 1950s the building has been renovated and enlarged several times. Two new bodies have been added, but only their fa¸ade is in line with the nineteenth-century project.

Translated by Domenico Sonnante
Revised by Ilaria Noemi De Carlo

National monument since 1930, this residential quarter - which is part of the World Heritage List - is situated on the South-East area of Alberobello and it is separated from the Rione Monti Quarter by the offshore Largo Martellotta. At the beginning of the nineteenth century it had 400 trulli, which overlooked eight narrow streets, inhabited by 1,300 people.
According to the local historian Notarnicola, its name comes from "the fact that in the eighteenth century on its Eastern area (...)there was a little farmyard, compared with a bigger one, which was situated in Piazza delle Erbe [Piazza XXVII Maggio](...).The Aia Piccola was built when, due to the increase in the harvest - thanks to the development of the population - the biggest farmyard was no more sufficient for agricultural needs. Therefore, the area around the small farmyard took its name from its function. (...) In the Aia Piccola quarter there were also the farmyards Corte di Giangiacomo (...) and that of Pozzo Contino (…)". The Corti were walled yards placed in front of the house. Both the country house and the employers houses overlooked these yards, creating a sort of urban farmhouses.

Translated by Ilaria Noemi De Carlo

This quarter - which is on the World Heritage List - is situated on a hill and is made of more than a thousand trulli. The area was built on the slope of the hill, next to the offshore Largo Martellotta. Rione Monti consists of eight streets (Via Monte Nero, Via Monte S. Marco, Via Monte S. Gabriele, Via Monte S. Michele, Via Monte Sabotino, Via Monte Santo, Via Monte Adamello, Via Cadore), full of trulli, most of which are used as souvenirs shops. Via Monte Nero, Via Monte Pasubio, Via Monte S. Michele and Via Monte Sabotino are particularly important because there are the oldest trulli.
In 1843 the government issued the "Regulations of urban and rural organization", which forbade inhabitants to build with drystone techniques as it had been done until that moment. Those regulations had to be fulfilled in all Alberobello's streets apart from the Rione Monti quarter, where people could build with the ancient techniques due to the fact that it was inhabited by poor people. This is the reason why all the area - which at that time was made of 2,000 trulli - has been kept unchanged.
In 1910 a royal decree declared Rione Monti a National Monument, for the following reason: "Rione Monti quarter (…) is outstanding for its trullo-shaped buildings, so it is forbidden to disfigure it with modern buildings which would spoil the characteristic landscape. Rione Monti is important for its public interest and, therefore, it is subject to the restrictions (…) for the protection of arts and antiquity. " In 1923 the Municipality decided to put a marble slab on the fa¸ade of a trullo placed in Via Monte S. Gabriele in order to remember the visit of King Umberto II. Moreover, in behalf of the king this area was renamed Prince of Piemonte Monumental Area.

Translated by Ilaria Noemi De Carlo

Going up through Via Monte Nero you will chance upon this old trullo. Trulli Siamesi is a trullo with no windows and whose basis were put on big raw boulders.
It is famous for its "double-cone shape" and has two entrances, one for each cone, which overlook two different streets. Inside you can easily identify the two trulli, which used to be separated by a small door, whereas outside the two cones are linked one to the other. This characteristic, which is not present in more recent trulli, confirms the age of this dwelling.
Many people think that its particular shape is linked to a famous legend.

Translated by Ilaria Noemi De Carlo

Not so far from the city centre, Bosco Selva is a wood full of trees and vegetation. In 1811 Gioacchino Murat deprived the Count of Conversano of all the area, which became part of Alberobello's territory.
Since 1827 its area has gradually been reducing due to the transformation of fields into cultivations and to the overwhelming trees cutting. Indeed, in the last century the Municipality sold wooden in order to finance public works.
Recently, the whole area has been walled in for allowing people to walk freely. Close to it there are facilities such as a campsite and equipped areas.

Translated by Ilaria Noemi De Carlo

This district is a karstic area at North-East of Alberobello, among Castellana Grotte, Putignano and Selva di Fasano. All the area is crossed by a road which, since ancient times, has been used in order to link Peucetia territory and the Messapic one.
The area is one of the most fertile of all Puglia thanks to its very large and brown piece of land.
Not everybody agrees with the origin of this territory name. Firstly, it was just named Channel, but afterwards people added the specification Delle Pile (underground cisterns), and then they changed it into Di Pirro, from the name of an Epirus king who had been asked in 280 B.C. by Taranto inhabitants to help them against the Roman army.
Thanks to the soil fertility and the abundance of water reserves, peasants started to occupy all the best lands. Therefore, all the area was occupied by scattered settlements which have taken to the construction of masserie (farmhouses). They were built in strategic places in order to defend the family from stealers and highwaymen.
Masserie had got some trullo-shaped spaces, used as warehouses and cowsheds. In the farmhouses there were often farmyards - used to work the grain - and big wells for collecting water.
Masseria Badessa, Masseria Torricella, Masseria Malvisco and Masseria Cavallerizza are very important farmhouses. The last one has been built in the first decades of the sixteenth century and its history is linked to Coreggia district.

Translated by Ilaria Noemi De Carlo

The former "Fondazione Gigante" (Gigante's institute) - better known as "Casa Rossa" (Red House) - is a big masseria (farmhouse). It was built in the nineteenth century for Francesco Gigante, who used it as a School of Agronomy. The place chosen for building the house, which is in the district "Albero della Croce" (cross tree) and has an area of 72 hectares, had the aim of helping students concentrate for studying.
The school functioned until 1940, when the house was changed into an Internment camp for English people, German Jews, Italian Jews, Polish citizens, anarchic stateless people and antifascists. It was used until the 6 September 1943. The year later, it became an asylum for fascists and people convicted of war crime who had to wait for their trial. In 1947 it became an asylum for homeless women and foreigner refugees.
Since that moment onward, it has often changed its function. Nowadays, it is a private property.

Translated by Ilaria Noemi De Carlo

Today it is possible to see only a small part of the enormous project planned by the local architect Antonio Curri (1848-1916). Recalling the Egyptian style, the architect designed a double row of columns and a central dome flanked by a pyramid and an obelisk.
The current façade presents a pronaos made up of 12 columns with capitals on their top and flanked by two towers. The trabeation, which is made of an architrave, is decorated with motifs recalling ancient monuments.
The colonnade leads to a large courtyard provided with wide stairs at north, east and west, rising along the hill where the cemetery was built. Through these stairs you can reach a first open space with a central base chapel, built some decades ago without any dome and in which there are the tombs of bishops and priests of Alberobello.
This first part of the cemetery was inaugurated in 1904.

Translated by Alessandra Maggipinto
Revised by Ilaria Noemi De Carlo

Barsento is located in a geographic area that includes the territories of Alberobello, Noci, Putignano and Castellana Grotte.
In 1997 the Puglia Region declared part of this area Natural Reserve for anthropological and naturalistic protection reasons (EU Directive 92/43).
The Church of S. Maria di Barsento - which is located in this area - is very interesting. It has a cusped façade and an ancient entrance preceded by a quadrangular porch dating back to the XIV-XV century, closed on the two sides and with a pitched roof. Both the roofs of the naves and of the porch are covered with chianche (rectangular shaped stones).
The façade ends with a little bell-gable typical of Puglia rural architecture. Three little apses show the typical trullo-shaped roof.
Throughout the years the church has been subjected to many conservation and modernization interventions. Inside, the church is made of three barrel vault naves adjoining through arches which lay on squat shelves and square pillars. The minor naves were added later. The most ancient part of the building was made of a unique hall covered by wooden truss.
Each nave ends with a little apse and only the central one has a small square window which today is walled-up. In front of the three apses there are three altars, and the main one was rebuilt in the XVII century. Thanks to G. Assennato's studies we know that in that period Orazio Ruberto Pucci (1625-1698) - Gentleman of the Grand Duke of Tuscany' house Cosimo III, as well as his Ambassador in England and in the Kingdom of Naples - bought this area from the Duke of Nardò Girolamo Acquaviva. Since 1620 and till the end of the eighteenth century this place was called in different ways: S. Maria di Varieto, as well as Barsiento, Barsenti, Balsente and Verisento.
Nowadays, it is a private church.
The association Pro Oasi of Barsento, founded in 1995, besides promoting research about this place, is trying to protect the historical-architectural aspects not only of the church but also of the many Masserie which are present in that area.
The most important masserie are: I Monti, Papa Perta, Parco della casetta and Vaccari Contessa. At Masseria Angiulli it is still possible to visit a trullo with a particular paving called a pietra ficcata, i.e. made of small and medium chalky ashlars plunged into the land thanks to the weight of herds and their continuous passage on the land.
It is also important to mention the Grotta del sapone (the Soap Cave) and the Grotta della Madonna (Virgin Mary's Cave), which are linked to the local history, its worship and its popular legends.

Translated by Alessandra Maggipinto
Revised by Ilaria Noemi De Carlo

Coreggia is a distric of Alberobello, just three kilometers far from the town, and it firstly belonged to Egnatia, a coastal town which was very important in the forth and third century B.C.
It takes its name from the presence of Venetians in the Cavallerizza farmhouse, at Canale delle Pile. Between 1495 and 1532 thoroughbred horses were grown in this farmhouse and then they were taken to Coreggia for putting them the corregge (neck straps).
In 1748 a small chapel was built and it was opened and donated to Alberobello's parish in 1805. In the second half of the nineteenth century it was enlarged and dedicated to the Lady of the Rosary. The village belonged to Monopoli until Alberobello's mayor, after a long quarrel, obtained it. At the entrance of Coreggia there is a marble slab, next to the aforementioned church, remembering this event.

Translated by Ilaria Noemi De Carlo

One of the still existing ice houses of Alberobello is that of Massariola, which is three kilometers far from the town, between Chietri and Badessa farmhouses. This building was aimed at storing snow, which was kept during winter and then sold from June.
The house is a drystone building with a trullo-shaped conic roof and has two floors. One of the two actually is an underground, barrel-vaulted cistern, six metres deep and with two doors. You could access the first floor through external stairs. The first floor was barrel-vaulted and used as a barn. On the floor there was a barrel through which it was possible to throw down the straw, useful for storing the snow. Indeed, the snow was beaten and a layer of straw was put on it in order to keep it insulated. The last straw layer was the thickest one because it had to protect ice from sun rays. When summer started the owner of the ice house employed thirty skilled workers and three horseman for working the ice and cutting it into square blocks before transporting it.

Translated by Ilaria Noemi De Carlo